Turing's Man Blog

MS Access vs LightSwitch vs Visual Studio. Comparison

It's not a secret I like MS Access – at least from version 2003 (however, initially I was forced to work with 97 version in college). I've even developed quite a complex database application (Data Center Physical Infrastructure Manager - presented on Datacenter Dynamics Converged 2012 Warsaw), at least partially based on MS Access (2003, 2007 and now 2010), so I know its pros and cons. This is a great tool for data manipulation, application prototyping and development of in-house, departmental or SMBs' database applications. There are many examples where MS Access application evolved to a professional system (based on quite different technologies) or is still… MS Access based, however has grown over the time to a very important piece of software. Therefore, with all this being said – we are now ready to compare the following products: Microsoft Access, Visual Studio LightSwitch and Visual Studio platforms – from the scope of database developer. I've found a great material recently…

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GNU/Linux Distribution Timeline... Just like a family tree

Somewhere in 1996/97 my friend showed me Red Hat Linux… I’m almost sure it was “Colgate” (4.0) distribution. We were impressed by multiuser and multitasking capabilities, “kill -9 <pid>” command and… X Window System with FVWM’95 window manager. Since that time I’ve used many GNU/Linux distributions with Slackware Linux being my favourite one for many years (I still love it) and having some episodes with *BSD systems (especially FreeBSD), to finally decide to go with openSUSE on desktop. Now? There are thousands of different distributions to be checked out, though, we should realize that the roots, which are still alive today, are: Debian, Slackware and Red Hat (forgive me that I skipped prehistoric distros, like: Yggdrasil or DLD – Deutsche Linux-Distribution – these dinosaurs are significant, but totally forgotten today). Let’s have a look at the genealogic tree of GNU/Linux… 

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"8 Levels of IT Security in the Data Center"

Data center security is the subject which I'm currently involved in. Therefore, I spend a lot of time thinking and consulting all possible doubts with physical and IT security experts. That's obvious we cannot take security for granted, but we should think of it in a sense of being a kind of process – we have to take care about it all the time. Manage it, like any other process in our organization. The problem begins when we realize that to secure our data center we have to deal with many different layers of the same matter – from physical through operational up to information security. We have covered this issue to show how difficult  "data center security" subject can be on Turingsman.net, quite recently (check: What is "data center security"?). Today we will try a different – visual – approach to show "data center security" and its multi-layered complexity. Let's have a look on "8 Levels of IT Security in the Data Center" poster published by Wikibon Blog – all in all "one picture is worth a thousand words". That's not bad!

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DCIM – yet another hype?

I've recently found a very detailed and methodical article on DCIM systems – "Before you jump in to the DCIM hype..." by Jan Wiersma of Data Center Pulse. Today, when we hear about DCIM everywhere, same like with any other fashionable term in IT industry (read: "cloud", "big data" etc.), we should be ready to look at DCIM adaptation from critical point of view. The most important questions to be asked are – how can we support our data center processes and what data sources should we integrate with DCIM system (because integrating everything is definitely pointless, if even somehow possible)? Jan Wiersma's article will definitely help us to be prepared to answer these questions and – what is more important – to be able to define the scope of DCIM implementation in our organization.

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"Infratech - physical infrastructure for server rooms and data centers" conference from a team leader’s point of view

On April 25th 2013 I attended a data center conference, organized by Pure Conferences in Warsaw/Poland, and titled: "Infratech - infrastruktura fizyczna dla serwerowni i centrów danych" (in English: "Infratech - physical infrastructure for server rooms and data centers"). This was a very important occasion for me – not only Nordea Bank Polska S.A. was invited, but also my friend and team member, Zenon Ruta, was giving a presentation – titled: "Nowoczesne technologie, czy…?" (in English: "Modern technologies, or…?") – as an "independent expert".

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